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Bunions

bunion (hallux valgus) is a deformity characterized by lateral deviation of the great toe, often erroneously described as an enlargement of bone or tissue around the joint at the head of the big toe. As the great toe turns in toward the second toe the tissues surrounding the joint may become swollen and tender.

The term is used to refer to the pathological bump on the side of the great toe joint. The bump is partly due to the swollen bursal sac and/or an osseous(bony) anomaly on the joint where the first metatarsal bone and big toe meet. The larger part of the bump is a normal part of the head of first metatarsal bone that has tilted sideways to stick out at its top.

Signs and symptoms:

The symptoms of bunions include irritated skin around the bunion, pain when walking, joint redness and pain, and possible shift of the big toe toward the other toes. Blisters may form more easily around the site of the bunion as well.

Having bunions can also make it harder to find shoes that fit properly; bunions may force a person to have to buy a larger size shoe to accommodate the width the bunion creates. When bunion deformity becomes severe enough, the foot can hurt in different places even without the constriction of shoes because it then becomes a mechanical function problem of the forefoot.

Pathophysiology:

Bunions may be caused by a variety of conditions intrinsic to the structure of the foot – such as flat feet, excessive flexibility of ligaments, abnormal bone structure, and certain neurological conditions. Although some experts are convinced that poor-fitting footwear is the main cause of bunion formation, other sources concede that footwear only exacerbates the problem caused by the original biomechanical problem. Arthritis of the big toe joint, diminished and/or altered range of motion, and discomfort with pressure applied to the bump or with motion of the joint, may all accompany bunion development.

Treatment:

Bunions may be treated conservatively with changes in shoe gear, orthotics, rest, ice, and medications. Because Foot Control and Support Systems supports all 3 arches of the foot as well as keep the heel bone in proper alignment throughout the gait cycle Foot Control and Support Systems is successful in correcting the biomechanical problems that cause most bunions to develop. Surgery, by an orthopedic surgeon or a podiatrist, may be necessary if discomfort and deformity are severe enough.

How does Foot Control and Support Systems help me do all this?

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